Six Creative Ideas for Event and Meeting Planners to Drive Competitivness

1) Write a blog about your experiences and share it with your target audience. Set up Google Alerts with specific Keywords that reference topics that your audience would like to hear about – use these keywords, topics and content to spark your creativity. A blog is one of the most underused social media marketing methodologies and it can be shared across all of your social media accounts including: Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

2) Subscribe to your competitor’s Newsletters and pay attention to what they are doing. You don’t want to plagiarize from them but their activities can and should function as a means to get you motivated and/or as a source for ideas. And, don’t feel guilty about subscribing to their Newsletter, as the savvy competitors will be doing this to you!

3) Get off the grid (the internet) and take a long week-end off. This will do wonderful things for your creativity and you will be surprised at the “creative juices” that will flow as a result of your taking time off. And, if you like the outdoors (or not) get out there and spend some time refreshing your senses.

4) Follow a good number of design blogs – anyone in Event Planning needs to stay plugged in with what is occurring in the larger designer community. These can be web site design blogs or even architectural design blogs. Both of them will give you some insight with how colors, shapes and forms and function are being used and/or articulated by top tier designers. And, mix and match your selections by using US based designers and some from outside the US – you’ll get a broader set thoughts and topics.

5) Twitter is a great resource for ideas, themes occurring in the Events industry and or competitive intelligence. You can source lists of influential Event Planners easily via the public web and you can also build your own list of people and/or brands you want to Follow via Twitter just by looking at and reviewing the Followers that other Event Profs, Brands and/or organizations are Following via this vibrant social media platform.

6) Listen to your audience (customers, attendees, sponsors, speakers, etc.) by actively polling them for ideas that you can incorporate in your next event. Attendee questionnaires are not always leveraged by many Event Profs – they have a great deal of information, provided they are structured properly (what worked and what didn’t?) and they must be read to be properly mined for nuggets of inspiration and creativity.

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